conspiracies

Ep 60: The Count of Saint Germain, Part 3

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Photo Gallery:

Photos:

1 )The Wandering Jew by Gustave Doré. 2) Image of the inscription from The Count of St. Germain’s “Triangle Book,” which seems to be a collection of coded symbols related to alchemy or lost ancient wisdom. Notice the sigil of the dragon, a symbol significant in alchemy. 3) Sirhan Sirhan, the man convicted for the 1968 assassination of U.S. SenatorRobert F. Kennedy. To this day, Sirhan claims he had no memory of the event. Sirhan used to frequent an occult shop in New Orleans and is said to have always carried a copy of Madame Helena Blavatsky’s book, The Secret Doctrine. It is also said that it was the first book he asked for when imprisoned. 4) Isaac (ben Solomon) Luria Ashkenazi (1534 – July 25, 1572) was a foremost rabbi and Jewish mystic in the community of Safed in the Galilee region of Ottoman Syria. He is considered the father of contemporary Kabbalah, his teachings being referred to as Lurianic Kabbalah. 5) American comedian, impressionist, and actor Kevin Pollak, known for his roles in The Usual Suspects and A Few Good Men, and for his regular appearances on the Tonight Show with Johnny Carson. There are those that believe he closely resembles the one known painting/engraving of The Count. 6) Manly Palmer Hall (March 18, 1901 – August 29, 1990) was a Canadian-born author and mystic. He is best known for his 1928 work The Secret Teachings of All Ages. Hall wrote the foreword for The Count’s book The Most Holy Trinosophia. “Acquisition of the Manly Palmer Hall Collection in 1995 provided the Getty Research Institute with one of the world’s leading collections of alchemy, esoterica, and hermetica.” 7) Rembrandt’s A Man in Armour, dated 1655; oil on canvas; now residing at the Kelvingrove Art Galler and Museum, Glasgow. Rudolf Steiner once identified Rembrandt’s painting “A Man in Armour” as a portrait of Christian Rosenkreuz, apparently in a 17th-century manifestation. 8) From Wikipedia: The Tree of Life is a classic descriptive term for the central mystical symbol used in the Kabbalah of esoteric Judaism, also known as the 10 Sephirot. Its diagrammatic representation, arranged in 3 columns/pillars, derives from Christian and esoteric sources and is not known to the earlier Jewish tradition. The tree, visually or conceptually, represents as a series of divine emanations God’s creation itself ex nihilo, the nature of revealed divinity, the human soul, and the spiritual path of ascent by man. In this way, Kabbalists developed the symbol into a full model of reality, using the tree to depict a map of Creation. 9) Jiddu Krishnamurti (11 May 1895 – 17 February 1986) was a philosopher, speaker, and writer. In his early life, he was groomed to be the new World Teacher but later rejected this mantle and withdrew from the Theosophy organization behind it. 10) Elizabeth Clare Prophet (April 8, 1939 – October 15, 2009) was an American New Age minister and religious figure, author, orator, and writer. 11) A visual interpretation of Christian Rosenkreuz (also spelled Rosenkreutz) “Frater C.R.C. (Christian Rosy Cross)” thought to be the legendary, possibly allegorical, founder of the Rosicrucian Order (Order of the Rosy Cross). He is presented in three manifestos that were published early in the 17th century. These were: Fama Fraternitatis; Confessio Fraternitatis and The Chymical Wedding of Christian Rosenkreutz. 12) Edgar Cayce (March 18, 1877 – January 3, 1945) was an American Christian mystic who answered questions on subjects as varied as healing, reincarnation, wars, Atlantis, and future events while in a trance. A biographer gave him the nickname, “The Sleeping Prophet.” A nonprofit organization, the Association for Research and Enlightenment, was founded to facilitate the study of Cayce’s work. A hospital and a university were also established. 13) Count Alessandro di Cagliostro (2 June 1743 – 26 August 1795) was the alias of the occultist Giuseppe Balsamo ([dʒuˈzɛppe ˈbalsamo]; in French usually referred to as Joseph Balsamo). Cagliostro was an Italian adventurer and self-styled magician. He became a glamorous figure associated with the royal courts of Europe where he pursued various occult arts, including psychic healing, alchemy and scrying. 14) Helena Petrovna “Madame” Blavatsky (12 August [O.S. 31 July] 1831 – 8 May 1891) was a Russian occultist, spirit medium, and author who co-founded the Theosophical Society in 1875. She gained an international following as the leading theoretician of Theosophy, the esoteric movement that the society promoted. 15) Late 60s or 70s artwork depicting the cultural and astrological Age of Aquarius. 16) Scott’s handiwork in Photoshop depicting a melding of Kevin Pollak and The Count’s visages.

 

Background:

There seems to be no doubt that the Count of Saint Germain existed, but how did he exist and for how long? There are levels to the incredulity of his story. It seems unlikely that one individual could possess so many varied talents, but the Count’s most unlikely talent was living into his 80s while still looking to be in his 50s. If you’re willing to go even further and believe the accounts of some of his contemporaries, then the Count was over 100 years old and lived well into the 19th century. Impossible you say? Then you might have even more trouble believing what many of those who had studied under him and some that continue to study his life believe, that the Count may have been hundreds or even thousands of years old, knew the ancient wisdom and secrets of life, and practiced the lost arts known only to the most enlightened beings. Whatever you choose to believe, a strong argument could be made that in his time and long after, he was actually the real “most interesting man in the world.”

Tonight’s Quote:

“He was, perhaps, one of the greatest philosophers who ever lived. The friend of humanity, wishing for money only that he might give to the poor, a friend to animals, his heart was concerned only with the happiness of others.”

— Prince Charles of Hesse-Cassel on the Count of Saint Germain from his book, Mémoires de Mon Temps

We’ve found that some sites are not showing these links as clickable unless they are URLs, so until those outlets improve their show notes section, we are providing actual URLs next to the clickable description of each link to make things easier for our listeners!

Ep 59: The Count of Saint Germain, Part 2

Podcast:

Photo Gallery:

Photos:

1 & 2 ) What is thought to be an image of the Count of Saint Germain. From Wikipedia: An engraving of the Count of St. Germain by Nicolas Thomas made in 1783, after a painting then owned by the Marquise d’Urfe and now apparently lost. Contained at the Louvre in France; 3 & 4) Isabel Cooper-Oakley 5) Francis II Rakoczy (The Count’s Father?) 6) Horace Walpole 7) Voltaire 8) Louis XV by Maurice Quentin de la Tour 1748 9) Louix XV by Rigaud 1730 10) Madame du Pompadour by Boucher 11) Rosicrucian Symbol 12) Prince Carl Hesse-Cassel 13 & 14) Chateau du Chambord 15) Alchemy

 

Background:

If you wished you could do all the things the Count of Saint Germain could do, meet all the people he had met, and learn all the secrets of life he seemed to possess, and on top of it all, have several lifetimes to employ your skills, what then? The question is, what would you do with these gifts? Would you be content to merely be the life of the party, or would you try and make a difference in the affairs of nations and enlighten humanity, even if it cost you your freedom or your once immortal life? Depending on your answer, the bigger question might be, does it take the right person to seek the mysteries, or do the mysteries seek the right person?

Tonight’s Quote:

“I thought, with all due respect to Madame la Comtesse, that the devil had long since made a mantle out of the skin of this personage.”

— Madame d’Adhemar’s maid, as she explained that the Count of Saint Germain was waiting to see her. From d’Adhemar’s book, “Souvenirs de la Marie Antoinette” published in 1836.

We’ve found that some sites are not showing these links as clickable unless they are URLs, so until those outlets improve their show notes section, we are providing actual URLs next to the clickable description of each link to make things easier for our listeners!

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Credits:

Episode 059 – “The Count of Saint Germain, Part 2” Produced by Scott Philbrook & Forrest Burgess; Edited by Sarah Vorhees, Ryan McCullough Sound Design; Research Assistance by Tess Pfeifle and the astonishing League of Astonishing Researchers, a,k.a. The Astonishing Research Corps, or “A.R.C.” for short. Copyright 2017 Scott Philbrook & Forrest Burgess. All Rights Reserved.

Ep 58: The Count of Saint Germain

Podcast:

Photo Gallery

Photos:

1 & 2 ) What is thought to be an image of the Count of Saint Germain. From Wikipedia: An engraving of the Count of St. Germain by Nicolas Thomas made in 1783, after a painting then owned by the Marquise d’Urfe and now apparently lost. Contained at the Louvre in France; 3 & 4) Isabel Cooper-Oakley 5) Francis II Rakoczy (The Count’s Father?) 6) Horace Walpole 7) Voltaire 8) Louis XV by Maurice Quentin de la Tour 1748 9) Louix XV by Rigaud 1730 10) Madame du Pompadour by Boucher 11) Rosicrucian Symbol 12) Prince Carl Hesse-Cassel 13 & 14) Chateau du Chambord 15) Alchemy

 

Background:

Who’s the most interesting person you’ve ever met? Can they play a musical instrument? Do they speak a foreign language? Are they a fine art painter? Have they traveled the world? Are they descended from royalty? Sure, maybe only a couple of those. But what if they were a concert level violinist who could also compose music? What if they could speak ten languages or more? What if it seemed they could produce precious gemstones and on top of that, were a military tactician who brokered diplomacy between nations? Impossible you say, for all of these talents and accomplishments to be contained within one individual? And yet all of these are the qualities and accomplishments claimed to be witnessed by the contemporaries of the man known mostly as the Count of Saint Germain. He was known by many names and for his many remarkable feats, but perhaps his most astounding accomplishment, as more than a few would claim, was to remain alive for several generations from the 18th century or earlier, into the 19th century and maybe even to this day.

Tonight’s Quote:

“He is a man who never dies, and who knows everything.”

— Voltaire, speaking about the Count of St Germain

We’ve found that some sites are not showing these links as clickable unless they are URLs, so until those outlets improve their show notes section, we are providing actual URLs next to the clickable description of each link to make things easier for our listeners!

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The Dark Myths Collective

http://darkmyths.org

Credits:

Episode 058 – “The Count of Saint Germain” Produced by Scott Philbrook & Forrest Burgess; Edited by Sarah Vorhees, Ryan McCullough Sound Design; Research Assistance by Tess Pfeifle and the astonishing League of Astonishing Researchers, a,k.a. The Astonishing Research Corps, or “A.R.C.” for short. Copyright 2017 Scott Philbrook & Forrest Burgess. All Rights Reserved.

Ep 36: The Somerton Man Mystery, Part 3 – The Theories

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1) Kim Philby, British-Russian double agent, and perhaps the most notorious and successful spy in the history of military intelligence. Is there a direct connection between Philby and the Somerton Man? 2) Donald Duart MacLean, British diplomat and one of the “Cambridge 5” spy ring. 3) Guy Burgess, British radio producer, intelligence officer, Foreign Office official and another member of the Cambridge 5. 4) Anthony Blunt, another Cambridge 5 member and Professor of Art History at the University of London, director of the Courtauld Institute of Art, and Surveyor of the Queen’s Pictures. His treatise on the French painter Nicolas Poussin, is regarded as a seminal work to this day. If you’ve listened to our Oak Island series, you’ll remember that Poussin painted the cryptic and mysterious Et in Arcadia ego which some believe may give clues as to what is buried at Oak Island. Everything is connected! 5) John Cairncross, thought to be the “Fifth Man” or the 5th member of the Cambridge 5. Some disagree as to his total involvement in the Ring of 5, although he publicly confessed to spying in 1951 and was named by both Blunt and Oleg Gordievsky and considered by some authorities as the most adept and successful of the ring. 6) Roger Hollis. Hollis was a British journalist and intelligence officer, and Director General of MI5 from 1956-65, who was also long-suspected of being a “mole.” Hollis was also in Australia around the time the Somerton Man was discovered , when he was part of the VENONA Project. This has fueled speculation that Hollis may have had something to do with The Somerton Man’s death and involvement with espionage. 7) The John Edgar Hoover letter obtained via the FOIA by Professor Abbott 8) TSM’s Fingerprints 9) The Tamam Shud Scrap found on TSM’s body 10) Jesstyn in her younger years. 11) Jesstyn’s Inscription to Alf Boxall in the copy of the Rubaiyat she gave him. 12) A Young Robin Thomson (TSM’s likely Son) 13) Robin again with his future wife, Roma. 14) Robin at the peak of his ballet days 15) Jesstyn’s School Photo 16) Robin and Roma when they toured together.(all personal photos courtesy of Professor Abbott 17) The Collection of Poetry Books with the Whitcomb & Tombs Rubaiyat from New Zealand 18) Listener Corryn Wilma who won the auction for us to get the books 19 – 36) Various photos of the W&T Edition of the Rubaiyat from New Zealand.

What you see additional are the Astonishing Legends copy of the Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam from New Zealand.

 

Background:

In death, The Somerton Man remains a mystery. But what was he in life? A Russian spy? Was he a black market racketeer, a professional dancer on holiday, an estranged lover saying goodbye one last time, or perhaps a combination of all of the above? Tonight in our final episode on the mystery of The Somerton Man, we look at most of the major theories put forth, and until that day a breakthrough in the case comes to light, we say, Tamám Shud… It is finished.

Tonight’s Quote:

“Please be advised that a search of these prints through the Identification Division of the FBI has failed to disclose any record. Sincerely Yours, John Edgar Hoover.”

— Excerpt from a January 1949 Letter to the Adelaide Police Commissioner obtained by Professor Abbott through the Freedom of Information Act regarding the Somerton Man’s Fingerprints.

Show Links:

We’ve found that some sites are not showing these links as clickable unless they are URLs, so until those outlets improve their show notes section, we are providing actual URLs next to the clickable description of each link to make things easier for our listeners!

The Dark Myths Collective:

The Dark Myths Collective! http://darkmyths.org

SIGN THIS PETITION FOR EXHUMATION OF THE SOMERTON MAN SO HE CAN BE PROPERLY LAID TO REST!

http://bit.do/somerton

Show Links:

Credits:

Episode 036 – “The Somerton Man, Part 3: The Theories” Produced by Scott Philbrook & Forrest Burgess; Ryan McCullough Sound Design; Research Assistance by Tess Pfeifle and the astonishing League of Astonishing Researchers, a,k.a. The Astonishing Research Corps, or “A.R.C.” for short. Copyright Scott Philbrook & Forrest Burgess 2016. All Rights Reserved.

Ep 35: The Somerton Man Mystery, Part 2B

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Photo Gallery:

Photos:

1) Professor Derek Abbott of the University of Adelaide, Australia. Notice the stripes on his tie slant downward from left shoulder to right beltline, or “from heart to sword,” in the U.K. fashion. This is opposite of the tradition of ties manufactured in the U.S. and the opposite of the tie found on the Somerton Man, leading some to speculate that he may have been an American. 2) The famous ‘X Marks the Spot picture from years ago. 3) The same exact spot today. 4) That spot again, but looking south. 5) The same spot, looking straight northward on the beach towards Glenelg. 6) The funeral (featured in Part 1 as well) 7) John ‘Barb’ Dwyer 8) Sir John Burton Cleland 9) The Suitcase and it’s Contents 10) The Strathmore Hotel, where a strange man stayed just before TSM was found. 11) A portrait of how TSM might have actually looked 12) The Adelaide Museum where Paul Lawson worked (it’s had a facelift) 13) Neil Day, the deceased Jockey 14) The thread from the suitcase that matched the sewing repair on TSM’s clothes. 15) THE LAUNDRY MARKS 16) Looking for hairs in the bust of TSM 17) Alfred Boxall 18) Boxall’s copy of The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam

 

Background:

We conclude our interview with Professor Derek Abbott in Part 2B of The Somerton Man series, where we learn that when you engage a mystery, the mystery can engage you.

Tonight’s Quote:

“Ah, make the most of what we yet may spend,

Before we too into the Dust descend;

Dust into Dust, and under Dust, to lie,

Sans Wine, sans Song, sans Singer, and—sans End!”

Quatrain 23 from Edward Fitzgerald’s translation of The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam

Show Links:

We’ve found that some sites are not showing these links as clickable unless they are URLs, so until those outlets improve their show notes section, we are providing actual URLs next to the clickable description of each link to make things easier for our listeners!

The Dark Myths Collective:

The Dark Myths Collective! http://darkmyths.org

SIGN THIS PETITION FOR EXHUMATION OF THE SOMERTON MAN SO HE CAN BE PROPERLY LAID TO REST!

http://bit.do/somerton

Show Links – Links are the same as Part 1 as similar material is covered. New Links will appear for final Part 3 on Theories.

Credits:

Episode 035 – “The Somerton Man, Part 2B” Produced by Scott Philbrook & Forrest Burgess; Ryan McCullough Sound Design; Research Assistance by Tess Pfeifle and the astonishing League of Astonishing Researchers, a,k.a. The Astonishing Research Corps, or “A.R.C.” for short. Copyright Scott Philbrook & Forrest Burgess 2016. All Rights Reserved.

Ep 34: The Somerton Man Mystery, Part 2A

Podcast:

Photo Gallery:

Photos:

1) Professor Derek Abbott of the University of Adelaide, Australia. Notice the stripes on his tie slant downward from left shoulder to right beltline, or “from heart to sword,” in the U.K. fashion. This is opposite of the tradition of ties manufactured in the U.S. and the opposite of the tie found on the Somerton Man, leading some to speculate that he may have been an American. 2) The famous ‘X Marks the Spot picture from years ago. 3) The same exact spot today. 4) That spot again, but looking south. 5) The same spot, looking straight northward on the beach towards Glenelg. 6) The funeral (featured in Part 1 as well) 7) John ‘Barb’ Dwyer 8) Sir John Burton Cleland 9) The Suitcase and it’s Contents 10) The Strathmore Hotel, where a strange man stayed just before TSM was found. 11) A portrait of how TSM might have actually looked 12) The Adelaide Museum where Paul Lawson worked (it’s had a facelift) 13) Neil Day, the deceased Jockey 14) The thread from the suitcase that matched the sewing repair on TSM’s clothes. 15) THE LAUNDRY MARKS 16) Looking for hairs in the bust of TSM 17) Alfred Boxall 18) Boxall’s copy of The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam

 

Background:

As with any great mystery, it can turn some individuals into steadfast researchers and citizen detectives, dedicating years to a quest for answers. We were lucky enough to interview one such person, Professor Derek Abbott of the University of Adelaide in Australia. In addition to teaching Electrical Engineering at the University, Professor Abbott also has a background in Physics, biomedical engineering, complex systems, and probability theory, which can involve the fields of cryptography and forensics. He first became interested in the Somerton Man case around 1995, and then fully immersed himself in an effort to crack the cryptography aspect in 2007, even enlisting the aid of some of his students as a school project. In Part Two of our series, Professor Abbott gives us an overview of the story, then shares some of his findings and conclusions.

Tonight’s Quote:

“Yes, this man has someone to love him. He is known only to God.”

Captain E.J. Webb of the Salvation Army at The Somerton Man’s Funeral, as cited in Gerald Feltus’ book, The Unknown Man

Show Links:

We’ve found that some sites are not showing these links as clickable unless they are URLs, so until those outlets improve their show notes section, we are providing actual URLs next to the clickable description of each link to make things easier for our listeners!

The Dark Myths Collective:

The Dark Myths Collective! http://darkmyths.org

SIGN THIS PETITION FOR EXHUMATION OF THE SOMERTON MAN SO HE CAN BE PROPERLY LAID TO REST!

http://bit.do/somerton

Show Links – Links are the same as Part 1 as similar material is covered. New Links will appear for final Part 3 on Theories.

Credits:

Episode 034 – “The Somerton Man, Part 2A” Produced by Scott Philbrook & Forrest Burgess; Ryan McCullough Sound Design; Research Assistance by Tess Pfeifle and the astonishing League of Astonishing Researchers, a,k.a. The Astonishing Research Corps, or “A.R.C.” for short. Copyright Scott Philbrook & Forrest Burgess 2016. All Rights Reserved.

Ep 33: Tamam Shud – The Somerton Man Mystery

Podcast:

Photo Gallery:

Photos:

1) X Marks the Spot where The Somerton Man was Found. Crippled Children’s Home in the Background. 2) Autopsy Photo 1, taken after he’d been frozen for quite some time. 3) Autopsy Photo 2. 4) John ‘Barb’ Dwyer, the man who performed the Autopsy. 5) The Somerton Man’s fingerprints. 6) After Jack Lyons saw the body, a young couple called Gordon Strapps and Olive Neill saw the man on the evening of the 30th Nov 1948 , apparently still alive. 7) The Tamam Shud paper found in TSM’s fob pocket. 8) Neil Day was one of the Jockeys who first discovered the dead body early in the morning on 1st Dec 1948. The other jockey was Horace “Horrie” Patching. 9) The Suitcase and its contents. 10) A close-up of some of the suitcase contents. 11) TSM’s funeral. 12) The Adelaide Police Station (new building since 1948). 12) same 13) The cipher or code found in the back of The Rubaiyat in Mr. Francis’ car. 14) Jestyn ‘Jo’ Thomson and her son Robin Thomson circa 1948. 15) The Royal Adelaide Hospital where he was taken but not admitted. 16) same 17) The Adelaide Train Station where his suitcase was left and he purchased the unused ticket to Henley Beach. 18-21) same 22) Robin Thomson during his impressive career as a ballet dancer. 23) Robin Thomson 24) Parkside Mental Hospital were a man claiming to know who TSM was was committed after his 1 year old son was found dead. 25) The Cemetery where TSM is buried. 26-28) TSM’s grave. 29) A technician works to extract hair for DNA testing from the police bust. 30) A portrait commissioned by Professor Derek Abbott that shows what TSM might have actually looked like. – Modern Day Adelaide photos courtesy of photographer Ben Abercrombie, All Rights Reserved. Other photos are public record or provided by Professor Derek Abbott.

 

Background:

Of the six questions — who, what, when, where, how and why — we only know three when it comes to the mystery of “The Somerton Man.” What and where: a middle-aged man found dead on Somerton Beach, which borders the Adelaide, Australia, suburb of Glenelg. When: he was found by passersby at 6:30 a.m. on December 1, 1948. As for the remaining questions, authorities, academics, authors, Australians and curious citizens the world over have been seeking answers ever since. The mundane yet mysterious items found on his person and in an unclaimed suitcase (thought to be his) at the Adelaide railway station would yield few clues and many more questions. He had no wallet or identification, and all the tags on his clothing were meticulously removed. Investigators had virtually nothing to go on, except for one intriguing thing: a scrap of paper torn from the last page of a first edition translation of eleventh-century poetry, the Rubaiyat of Omar Kayyam, which was found rolled up in the man’s watch pocket. On it were the words, “Tamám Shud,” meaning “ended” or “finished” in Persian, and giving this mystery its other renowned moniker: “The Tamám Shud Case.” When the book from which the page was torn surfaced some time later, there appeared to be an unbreakable coded message written on one of the last pages. Further adding to the mystery, there was the assessment by a senior pathologist that the victim most likely died from an untraceable poison. Whether “The Somerton Man” was just a napping tourist with a degenerative disease, a jilted lover out to end it all, or a Cold War spy whose mission had been terminated, we may never know.

This is Part 1 of our our 3 Part in-depth series on The Somerton Man

Tonight’s Quote:

‘Tis all a Chequer-board of Nights and Days

Where Destiny with Men for Pieces plays:

Hither and thither moves, and mates, and slays,

And one by one back in the Closet lays.

A selected quatrain from Edward Fitzgerald’s 1st edition translation of theRubaiyat of Omar Khayyam

Show Links:

We’ve found that some sites are not showing these links as clickable unless they are URLs, so until those outlets improve their show notes section, we are providing actual URLs next to the clickable description of each link to make things easier for our listeners!

The Dark Myths Collective:

The Dark Myths Collective! http://darkmyths.org

SIGN THIS PETITION FOR EXHUMATION OF THE SOMERTON MAN SO HE CAN BE PROPERLY LAID TO REST!

http://bit.do/somerton

Show Links

Credits:

Episode 033 – “The Somerton Man” Produced by Scott Philbrook & Forrest Burgess; Ryan McCullough Sound Design; Research Assistance by Tess Pfeifle and the astonishing League of Astonishing Researchers. Copyright Scott Philbrook & Forrest Burgess 2016. All Rights Reserved.

Ep 31: Polybius Ultra

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Background:

Our ancient ancestors spoke of a legendary place — where the young and young at heart could test their skills against a magical, electronic device, using strategy and their reflexes at 25¢ a pop. These wondrous havens were called “Video Arcades” and these hulking machines were called “Video Games.” Believe it or not kids, it was the only place you could play a decent-looking, somewhat sophisticated video game, housed in a heavy, laminated wooden cabinet, because at the time the only thing you could play on your “push-button” phone was a tune like, “Mary Had a Little Lamb.” There is another legend however, that at least in one or more of these Video Arcades in Portland, Oregon in 1981 A.D., there lurked a mysterious Arcade Game called “Polybius” and it had a much more nefarious purpose than to provide amusement and rook a kid out of a short stack of quarters — it may have been there to try its hand at brainwashing you, and then report its findings to a sinister government agency. There were reports of players who suffered terrible side effects from the visual phantasmagoria of the gameplay, like severe headaches, nausea, memory loss, nightmares, an aversion to playing any video games afterwards and in some extreme cases, suicide. But were these reports true? Did this diabolical game ever exist? Was the legend of Polybius just an “Urban Legend?” One thing we do know is true, prior to the legend of Polybius, a secret government agency really did try to zap unsuspecting people’s brains and take notes.

Tonight’s Quote:

“The obvious objective of video games is to entertain people by surprising them with new experiences.”

Miyamoto Shigeru, the “Father of Modern Video Games” and Co-creator of The Legend of Zelda, Donkey Kong, Super Mario Brothers and many more.

We’ve found that some sites are not showing these links as clickable unless they are URLs, so until those outlets improve their show notes section, we are providing actual URLs next to the clickable description of each link to make things easier for our listeners!

Credits:

Episode 031 – “Polybius Ultra” Produced by Scott Philbrook & Forrest Burgess; Ryan McCullough Sound Design; Research Assistance by Tess Pfeifle. Copyright Scott Philbrook & Forrest Burgess 2016. All Rights Reserved.

Photos:

1) Opening title screen-shot of an imagined re-creation of the mysterious “Polybius” Video Arcade game. This re-created game is based on the legend’s passed-down descriptions of the original game, as no original game play data is known to exist. Some have claimed to own computer ROM images of the original game, but no one seems to be able to offer any proof. 2) A screen-shot of the very real original Arcade Game “Tempest.” 3) A “freeze-frame gag” as the writers of the Simpsons called them, where Bart Simpson is about to play a video game called “Triangle Wars” at the Springfield Mall. Notice the “Polybius” game to his right, and the joke stencil, “Property of U.S. Government” on the cabinet’s face. Also, the game only seems to need one button to play it — you hit it, and the game takes care of the rest. Image property of “The Simpsons” television show; Copyright 2006 by 20th Century Fox, from the Willamette Week article listed in the links section.

Ep 30: Kincaid’s Cave in the Grand Canyon

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Background:

On March 12, 1909, The Arizona Gazette published an article titled, “G. E. Kincaid Reaches Yuma.” It was a short, mildly interesting announcement that Mr. “Kincaid” was only the second person to make the perilous boat trip down the entire course of the Colorado River, starting from Green River, Wyoming and eventually reaching Yuma, Arizona. A feat worthy of mention in the papers of course, but aside from stating that he took over 700 photographs and “Some interesting archaeological discoveries were unearthed,” there was not much indication of the news which was to come next. Twenty four days later, on April 5, 1909, the newspaper ran a follow-up to their first article on the adventurous Mr. Kincaid, except this time it was full, front-page coverage on just what discoveries he’d unearthed previously. This article (also uncredited) reported that along with “G.E. Kinkaid” (his name now spelled with a “k”) a “Professor S.A. Jordan” and a team from the Smithsonian had investigated what appeared to be a large network of tunnels and rooms, some filled with ancient mummies and artifacts that did not appear to be from the Western Hemisphere. And that was the end of the story. No further stories were printed by the newspaper, no knowledge by the Smithsonian about any such expedition, and no one knows if “Kinkaid” or “Jordan” ever existed, let alone the cave itself. That leaves us with two questions: is this story real, and if real, what would be the implications to world history?

Tonight’s Quote:

“First, I would impress that the cavern is nearly inaccessible. The entrance is 1,486 feet down the sheer canyon wall. It is located on government land and no visitor will be allowed there under penalty of trespass.”

– “G.E. Kincaid,” Explorer, referring to a cave full of anomalous artifacts he discovered in the Grand Canyon.

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Credits:

Episode 030 – “Kinkaid’s Cave” Produced by Scott Philbrook & Forrest Burgess; Ryan McCullough Sound Design; Research Assistance by Tess Pfeifle. Copyright Scott Philbrook & Forrest Burgess 2016, All Rights Reserved.

Photos:

1) Image of the original article in the Arizona Gazette from March 12, 1909, which is the first mention of a “G.E. Kincaid,” his trip down the entire Colorado River, and of a possible discovery of archaeological importance; 2) Image of the 2nd and more thorough front-page article in the Arizona Gazette, dated April 5, 1909, which describes in detail the incredible and potentially history changing discoveries of “G.E. Kinkaid.” Note that with both Arizona Gazette articles, there are no writer’s byline, and that for whatever reason, the spelling of “G.E.’s” name has changed from “Kincaid” with a “c” to “Kinkaid” with a “k.” To this day, these articles are the only known published source references to “G.E. Kinkaid,” his colleague “Professor S.A. Jordan,” or their investigative team from the Smithsonian Institution (referred to in the articles as the “Smithsonian Institute”) or of the 700 photographs, artifacts collected, and the cave location itself. The entire story remains a mystery. 3) A computer rendering by Jack Andrews, copyright ©2000, depicting the deity statue purportedly found by G.E. Kinkaid not far from the entrance to the cave he discovered. 4) A diagram of Kinkaid’s Cave complex layout, as imagined and illustrated by Jack Andrews, ©2001; 5) Isis Temple in the Grand Canyon. Photo from the Strange Conspiracies website: http://www.strangeconspiracies.com/2012/07/conspiracy-of-isis-temple-in-grand.html; 6) The “Tower of Set” in the Grand Canyon, photo from the webpage http://www.crystalinks.com/gc_egyptconnection.html; 7) The “Tower of Ra” in the Grand Canyon, photo from the webpage http://www.crystalinks.com/gc_egyptconnection.html; 8) Zoroaster Temple in the Grand Canyon, photo from the webpage http://www.crystalinks.com/gc_egyptconnection.html; 9) Photo of Stanton’s Cave by Joshua M. on Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/gonzo_fan2007/2397439638. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/ . No changes were made to the image. Stanton’s Cave is often mis-identified in website photos of as Kinkaid’s Cave, of which there are no known photos. Stanton’s Cave is also well known to the National Park Service and visitors alike, and numerous Native American artifacts have been discovered inside. 10) Engraving of infamous hoaxer Joseph Mulhattan (also spelled “Mulhatton” and “Mulholland”). From the hoaxes.org website; 11) Portrait of John Wesley Powell (1889), oil on canvas by Edmund Clarence Messer. Photo by Cliff on Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/nostri-imago/3439636898 . No changes were made to this copy, except that it looks like the gilded frame was cropped at some point. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/ . John Wesley Powell (March 24, 1834 – September 23, 1902) gained fame for his “Powell Geographic Expedition” in 1869 which ran the length of the Green and Colorado Rivers in the United States. This made Powell and his party the first known Europeans to traverse the Grand Canyon. He became the Smithsonian Institution ‘s first director of the Bureau of Ethnology while serving as director of the U.S. Geological Survey.

Ep 29: The KGC: An American Conspiracy (Part 3)

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Background:

They had lawyers, guns and money, as well as cartographers and engineers, tradesmen, politicians and professionals of all station, all embedded in American society and the money in the earth itself. One day these would all be needed by the Knights of the Golden Circle and if the people, their skills and their ideals would not survive the generations then their amassed fortune would. And here is where one legend intersects with another: The Lost Dutchman Mine and the Knights of the Golden Circle. Was the Lost Mine a massive KGC treasure cache? It’s treasure may never be found, but those that have gone looking may have found its sentinels, and along with it, an often mysterious demise.

Tonight’s Quote:

“…The secessionists of (El) Monte are only awaiting the withdrawal of troops from Los Angeles before they commence operations…”

Edwin A. Sherman, San Bernardino County Newspaper Editor in a letter to Union Army General E. V. Sumner, Commander of the U.S. Pacific Division

Show Links:

We’ve found that some sites are not showing these links as clickable unless they are URLs, so until those outlets improve their show notes section, we are providing actual URLs next to the clickable description of each link to make things easier for our listeners!

Credits:

Episode 029 – “Knights of the Golden Circle – Part 3” Produced by Scott Philbrook & Forrest Burgess; Ryan McCullough Sound Design; Research Assistance by Tess Pfeifle. Copyright Scott Philbrook & Forrest Burgess 2015, All Rights Reserved.

Photos:

1) A photo believed to be of a young Jacob Waltz in New York c. 1846, from Sheriff Magazine, 1967 and the Superstition Mountain Historical Society. Waltz was a German immigrant affectionately known as “The Dutchman” and the legendary namesake/finder/keeper of the “Lost Dutchman Mine” on Superstition Mountain in Arizona, and also possibly a KGC sentinel; 2) Believed to be a photo of an older Jacob Waltz upon his trusty burro riding through town. Ph0to from the lostwilds.com website; 3) Jacob Waltz’s gravesite, added to the findagrave.com website by Jeff M. Sullivan; 4) Elisha Marcus Reavis, “The Hermit of Superstition Mountain” and suspected KGC sentinel – photo from the Arizona Historical Society; 5) Detail of “The Horse Map,” one of the “Peralta Stones” or “Superstition Mountain Stone Tablets” thought to possibly lead to the “Lost Dutchman Mine” if one could figure out the symbology of the directional markers and clues. Photo from the desertusa.com website featureing an article by Jim Hatt; 6) Detail of the “Heart Map” Photo from the desertusa.com website featuring an article by Jim Hatt; 7) Detail of the “Priest Map” Photo from the desertusa.com website featuring an article by Jim Hatt;8) Detail of the “Trail Map” Photo from the desertusa.com website featuring an article by Jim Hatt; 9) A compilation of the four major “Peralta” or “Superstition Mountain Stone Tablets” along with the inset heart stone and stone crosses, Photo from the desertusa.com website featuring an article by Jim Hatt.

Ep 28: The KGC: An American Conspiracy (Part 2)

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Photo Gallery:

 

Background:

The Confederate Army’s losses at the battles of Gettysburg and Vicksburg in July 1863 marked a turning point in America’s Civil War, one that was not favorable for furthering the cause of “Southern Independence.” With the hopes of an overall military victory for the Confederacy now beginning to fade, the clandestine leaders of the KGC took the movement fully underground, secreting not only their commands and communications, but also their amassed wealth and weapons. There is sufficient circumstantial evidence to suggest that significant amounts of gold and silver as well as armaments had been collected by the KGC from agents, members and sympathizers, but that then begs the question, where did it all go? If a vast, non-centralized network of money and guns needed to be kept from the hands of a dominant and soon to be victorious Union government, what methodology could a secret organization use to hide it all, and who and what system could be trusted to find it again when it was needed? Part Two of our series on the Knights of the Golden Circle takes a look at where they may have gotten their gains, and what legendary names, famous and infamous, may have helped them.

Tonight’s Quote:

“It’s my damn story, and if they don’t believe it I’m not gonna worry about it, damn it. Pardon my French.”

– Bob Brewer

We’ve found that some sites are not showing these links as clickable unless they are URL’s, so until those outlets improve their show notes section, we are providing actual URL’s next to the clickable description of each link to make things easier for our listeners!

Credits:

Episode 028 – “Knights of the Golden Circle – Part 2” Produced by Scott Philbrook & Forrest Burgess; Ryan McCullough Sound Design; Research Assistance by Tess Pfeifle. Copyright Scott Philbrook & Forrest Burgess 2015, All Rights Reserved.

Photos:

1) Portrait of Ferdinand Maximilian Joseph as Emperor of Mexico, “Maximiliano I”, by Franz Xaver Winterhalter, 1864; 2) Photograph of Emperor Maximilian I of Mexico, circa 1865; 3) Maximilian’s embalmed corpse on display in Mexico, photograph by François Aubert; 4) The most commonly seen portrait of the original Jesse Woodson James, circa 1882; 5) Jesse James as a young man, date of photo unknown; 6) Portraits of Jesse James and his brother Frank James, Jesse above Frank; 7) Frank James on the left, Jesse James on the right; 8) Another often seen portrait of Jesse and Frank James, 9) A famous photo of Frank and Jesse posing with their pistols; 10) A newspaper photo of Jesse James after he’d been reportedly shot by Robert Ford, before James’ body was released to his family; 11) Posthumous close-up of Jesse James – is this the same man as in the other photos? 12) Jesse James’ family funeral. His brother Frank is just to the right of his coffin with his wife Ann behind him in white; 12) Robert “Bob” Newton Ford, a new addition to the James’ gang, who is believed to have shot Jesse on April 3, 1882 in the back of the head in order to collect $5000 in reward money, only a fraction of which he and his brother Charley would eventually claim. Ford himself would eventually be shot and killed by Edward O’Kelley in the temporary tent saloon he operated on June 8, 1892 in Creede, CO at the age of 30. 13) John Frank Dalton, who allegedly at the age of 100, claimed to be the original Jesse Woodson James. Born on March 8, 1848, J. Frank Dalton waited until the last 3 years of his long life to make his public declaration in Lawton, OK in the spring of 1948, that he was indeed the legendary outlaw. Although his claims have largely been dismissed by mainstream historians, there are credible researchers who believe his story is true. Adding to the controversy are compelling elements to the claim, such as distinguishing physical characteristics displayed by Dalton that purportedly match James’, such as seven bullet wounds, a rope burn around his neck, a collapsed lung, a missing fingertip, and severely burned feet. Even recent efforts to find the truth using DNA analysis have not yielded conclusive results. There remains doubt that Dalton’s remains were the ones that were actually exhumed for the DNA testing. There is also belief that the inquiry was possibly skewed because of the tourism dollars that James’ legend brings to the town’s economy. 14) KGC Membership Card.

Ep 27: The KGC: An American Conspiracy (Part 1)

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Background:

America in the mid-nineteenth century was still a very young nation in the process of finding its own identity, its states not yet fully or harmoniously united. Differing ideas on what methods of production and government its inhabitants should employ were fomenting into a house divided and would lead to one of the bloodiest and devastating civil wars any country could experience. Leading up to America’s Civil War, various factions were coalescing into numerous political parties and regional movements, with ideological lines drawn largely on the issue of slavery. The struggle for America’s southern states’ self-determination gave rise to a secret society known as the Knights of the Golden Circle, whose members were determined to gain power, wealth and influence for their cause either within the Union, or if necessary as their own autonomous territory. The birth of the United States as a nation would indeed be a painful and traumatic experience, the pangs of which would be felt and remembered to this day, and the hopes for the rise of the South kept alive perhaps more than the average American knows.

Tonight’s Quote:

“No matter what secrets may be given to me by a 57, if given as the secret of a 57 and because I am one, I will hold the same sacredly in my own knowledge, and never re-communicate it, even to a 57, unless authorized so to do by the brother whose secret it is.”

– KGC Initiation rites for their 3rd degree, within which membership was kept from all other members of the organization. (Published anonymously in 1861)

We’ve found that some sites are not showing these links as clickable unless they are URL’s, so until those outlets improve their show notes section, we are providing actual URL’s next to the clickable description of each link to make things easier for our listeners!

Credits:

Episode 027 – “Knights of the Golden Circle” Produced by Scott Philbrook & Forrest Burgess; Ryan McCullough Sound Design; Research Assistance by Tess Pfeifle. Copyright Scott Philbrook & Forrest Burgess 2015, All Rights Reserved.

Photos:

1) Cover of the book, “An Authentic Exposition of the Knights of the Golden Circle, or A History of Secession from 1834 to 1861, by a Member of the Order”; 2) George W.L. Bickley, considered the main founder of the K.G.C.; 3) Possible seal of the Knights of the Golden Circle; 4) Illustration of filibuster John A. Quitman, by Alonzo Chappel, courtesy of www.alonzochappel.org ; 5) Clement Vallandigham; 6) William Walker; 7) Portrait of Albert Pike, taken by famous Civil War photographer Mathew Brady; 8) Robert Rhett, considered “The Father of Secession;” 9) Benjamin McCulloch; 10) Illustration of a secret K.G.C. ceremony

Ep 23: Dyatlov Pass Part 1

 

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“I wonder what awaits us in this hike? Will anything new happen?”

– Zinaida “Zina” Kolmogorova

 

Background:

On January 27, 1959, a group of outdoor enthusiasts, known as “tourists” in Russia, consisting of seven men and two women, mostly students and graduates of the Ural Polytechnical Institute (which is now the Ural Federal University) left the village of Vizhay in the northern Ural Mountains on a two-week ski trek, through a region called Sverdlovsk Oblast, the “gateway to Siberia” in Russia. In Russia a “tourist” is a serious outdoorsperson. The goal was to reach Otorten Mountain at the end of their journey. Their planned route would rank as a “Category III,” the most difficult classification for a hiking expedition in winter, which if successful, would qualify them as “Masters of Sport.” On February 1st as they started to move through a mountain pass on their last leg of the trip, bad weather and decreasing visibility forced them off course, and the group decided to make camp on the eastern slope of a small mountain called Kholat Syakhl by the indigenous Mansi peoples, which translates to “Dead Mountain” due to the area’s lack of wild game. Sometime during the night of February 2nd, the group suffered an unimaginably terrifying ordeal, sealing their fate. When they hadn’t been heard from by February 20th, a search party was formed to look for the missing youths. On February 26th the search party reached their camp and what they found would bring more questions than answers. It appeared as though something had scared the hikers so badly, that they panicked and ripped a hole in the side of their tent in order to escape, shoeless, into – 20º F (-29º C) snowfall. It was determined by Soviet authorities that the group had met with a “compelling unknown force” causing them all to flee and ultimately die of exposure with some also suffering significant internal injuries such as broken ribs and fractured skulls. There have since been many theories put forth as to what this force actually was, but we may never know what was so horrific that it caused this group of experienced adventurers to take leave of their senses and take their chances in the deadly wilderness. Following the incident, the mountain pass was named “Dyatlov Pass” in honor of the group’s leader, Igor Dyatlov.

 

Photos:

 
 

Location:

Dyatlov Pass, near Kholat Syakhl, Russia

 
 

Related Books:

 

Credits:

Episode 23: “Dyatlov Pass Part 1” Produced by Scott Philbrook & Forrest Burgess; Ryan McCullough Sound Design; Research Assistance by Tess Pfeifle. Copyright Scott Philbrook & Forrest Burgess 2015, All Rights Reserved.